Published by the 50/50 by 2030 Foundation, University of Canberra

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IWD 2020: Natasha Stott-Despoja AO In Conversation with Virginia Haussegger AM

by | Feb 6, 2020 | The Agenda

Covering issues ranging from politics, populism and the prevention of violence against women, this promises to be an evening of robust discussion, along with some heartfelt truths as we ask – what does it take to sustain feminist passion for advocacy and reform … when the bastards are no longer honest!

A former diplomat, women’s advocate and author, Natasha is the founding Chair of the Board of Our Watch, the national foundation to prevent violence against women and their children, and was previously the Australian Ambassador for Women and Girls from 2013 to 2016. She was also a Member of the World Bank Gender Advisory Council from 2015 to 2017 and a Member of the United Nations High Level Working Group on the Health and Human Rights of Women, Children and Adolescents. Natasha is a former South Australian Senator and made Australian history in 1995, aged 26, when she became the youngest woman elected to federal parliament, where she went on to become Leader of the Democrats and the party’s longest serving Senator.

This event is being hosted by the 50/50 by 2030 Foundation, BGL, University of Canberra.

Free event – registrations essential

Sponsored by UniSuper

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