Weekly Wrap

Keep up with who's doing what in the gender equality space ...

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NewsBrief: Week 2 May 2017

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Here’s what’s been blogging on BroadAgenda this past week...

This week our focus has been on gender equality and work. Relocating for a job opportunity is never easy, but in two-career families, the decision to move presents a whole new set of issues. Whose career comes first?  Jacklyn Wong's research looks at how gender shapes couples' decision-making. Perhaps unsurprisingly, her research shows that even in otherwise egalitarian couples, the responsibility for achieving work-family balance still often falls on women.

Continuing on the theme of work, Professor Laurie Brown crunches the superannuation figures. That women have lower superannuation balances has been long known, but what has received less attention is how factors such as age and divorce impact the finances in retirement. The numbers, it turns out, are particularly stacked against divorced, mature aged women. Finally, in the context of Kate Ellis' resignation, Emeritus Professor John Warhurst looks at how we could  improve our chances of achieving 50:50 representation by setting up more flexible working conditions for MPs. To actually embrace diversity in politics, we need to stop asking why did she leave, and instead focus on what we can do in the future to make people like her stay. 

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NewsBrief: Week 1 May 2017

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Here’s what’s been blogging on BroadAgenda this past week...
 
Aboriginal women in Australia fare worse than non-indigenous women on just about every health measure. Yet, there is a new determination within the medical community to change the course of Indigenous health. Professor Stephen Robson, President of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists,  is determined to tackle the issue head on. Pregnancy, he notes, is the perfect time to build trusting relationships with women and their families, with healthy and health-literate women being the single most important influence on the health of their communities.

Casting her eyes on the other side of the world, Dr Sonia Halpieri takes a look at how gender equality has been addressed in Finland. Dr Halpieri argues that Australia needs to embrace women’s legitimate right to political power at the popular and political levels, and shows that there’s quite a lot we could learn from the Finns. Finally, Dr Suzy Marsh’s inspiring research from New Zealand shows that money and loans aren’t always synonymous with economics and the bottom line. While no panacea to all the world’s ills, microcredit can provide both economic and emotional empowerment to women in times of need. But to be effective it needs to be kept small scale, local, uncomplicated, and above all, interest free.

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NewsBrief: Week 4 April 2017

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Here’s what’s been blogging on BroadAgenda this past week...
 
The Canberra Rape Crisis Centre marked its 40th Anniversary last year. Over the years, the CRCC has seen an extraordinary increase in demand for its services, with a much higher rate of young women seeking help and support. Yet, many suffer in silence, though the exact numbers aren’t known.  Chrystina Stanford, the CEO of the centre, initiates an open and frank discussion about sexual assault, and unpacks some of the mystery around how to best respond to victims in need of support.

This week we also go beyond the data and numbers, as our blogger ‘Jill’ discusses her sexual assault trauma that took place 15 years ago, when she was just a teenager. Jill’s brave blog highlights the uncomfortable silence surrounding the topic, as she notes that this is the first time she’s ever talked about it publically. Her emotional account also underscores the point made by Chrystina Stanford – sexual assault is common, but it is not normal. Finally, we bid a sad farewell to our much loved co-editor Lucy Parry, as she heads over to Europe to begin the next stage of her career. As her parting gift to us, Lucy reflects on her time here at BroadAgenda, focusing on the difficulties she encountered while sourcing appropriate stock images for the blog. Turns out, if you’re not under the age of 25, white, and find eating lettuce leaves hysterically funny, representative images are sometimes very hard to come by.

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NewsBrief: Week 3 April 2017

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Another busy BroadAgenda week with a whip around the world. In India we examine the role rural women are playing as critical change agents in local forest management, and how that may now be under threat. Back home, Law professor Margaret Thornton explains why giving birth is not like "buying a bag of chips", as one male judge suggested. Not surprisingly she's calling for greater transparency in judicial appointments. We look at how gendered marketing by toymakers helps shape kids gendered preferences. And we explore a timely analysis that shows the direct link between a nation's women's rights and its democratic strength.

In the news ...

The Peta for Peter's seat saga, left Kelly high and dry, in a week that's focused on women in high places under siege. A swanky, stylish Gladys Berejiklian turned cover girl for Good Weekend; after Gail Kelly shared some sage advice about straightening our shoulders. The Stella Prize for writers highlighted sexism in the sector; and we learnt that Australia's female judges have cracked the gender pay gap! (ok ... by less than half a percent, but still worth popping corks!) Globally, China's lack of women has men marrying robotic ones (what about the rust?) And in the UK the heat over heels and ban on flat shoes at work has law firm employees sharpening their stilettos. Happy Reading!

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NewsBrief: Week 2 April 2017

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This week we spotlight the gender gap in workforce participation, and ask how Australia will meet its G20 promise to cut the gap 25% by 2025. Dr Susan Harris Rimmer has 3 snappy ways to help make it happen. Should we follow the EU lead and have designated Female Entrepreneur Ambassadors? We talk medicine and name calling: the "de-professionalizing" of women Doctors. And we deconstruct the structural barriers to women working in medical specialisation in the UK.

In the news….

The Women and National Security conference got the mandarins nattering. Known for her careful and measured comments, Foreign Affairs boss Frances Adamson gave her own department and all its past chiefs a gender slap down. Meanwhile, the Defence Chief talked up the virtues of diversity, but with no defence force ever headed by a female, and none likely in the near future, it got the audience ... checking out their shoes. Globally, the gender pay gap is all the buzz, with the UK launching live reporting; and Google in trouble for "systematically" underpaying women. In the US Hilary Clinton slapped down Russia; while Ivanka Trump's 'behind the scenes' advocacy for women was scoffed by Scarlet as silly silence. Happy reading!

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NewsBrief: Week 1 April 2017

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US President, Donald Trump dished up plenty of material for satirists when he spoke at a Women's Empowerment event. While at the other end of the spectrum Hong Kong's new chief is calling on women to step forward; and Iceland is cracking down on 'proof' of pay parity. Meanwhile back in Australia, more proof that gender diversity strengthens business performance; Victoria kicks a gender goal with women on public boards; yet the ASX200 takes a gender tumble thanks to one exit - and now we are 9! And back in the US, bad news about Millenials and gender equality on the home front.

And on BroadAgenda …

Post CSW we take a look at SDG 3 and 5, along with a powerful program set up by two Canberra women to tackle the horrifying rate of maternal mortality in PNG. The founders of 'Send Hope Not Flowers', share the challenge and change a simply idea can generate. BroadAgenda co-editor, Dr Pia Rowe, returns new vigour to that old adage 'the personal is political', and shares the story of political activism through MamaBake. And we salute Eva Cox whose excellent and widely published post IWD commentary urges us to think more deeply about ... the point of it all. Happy reading!

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NewsBrief: Week 3 March 2017

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This week's talk swirls around politics; how women are faring and fitting in - or not! Former PM Julia Gillard gives a frank and sobering account of sexist skulduggery. In Western Australian, a record number of women win seats in the state election; while the Liberal party gets a toasting for its lack of women. Labor star Kate Ellis's political drop-out calls for new thinking. Saudi Arabia comes under global media attack for launching a council to empower girls with no girls or women in sight. And the US Women's March brings good news for the office supply industry. And the funniest spoof on female multitasking you'll ever see...

And on BroadAgenda …

We’re only 2 weeks old, and flying forward. More blogging on women in politics, and how what ‘she’ does is judged on a different scale to what ‘he’ does. We take a tough look at ‘elite’ feminism and what happens when personal progress masquerades as ‘women’s empowerment’… and we drop in to the Pacific Feminist Forum. Happy reading!

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NewsBrief: Week 2 March 2017

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Welcome to the BroadAgenda NewsBrief - a weekly, curated snapshot of news and views around gender equality, with a keen eye on issues such as leadership, diversity, governance, economic empowerment and the political participation of women. It’s a handy tool to help you keep across the latest media chat from Australia and around the globe, as well as an update on our latest blogs. Enjoy! 

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NewsBrief: Week 1 March 2017 

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Happy International Women’s Day – an auspicious occasion, as today marks the birth of BroadAgenda - our bold new blog, for broads, blokes, brawn and brain!This week we sit down with Vice Chancellor, Deep Sani, to dissect gender equality and his own experience of ‘bias’. In Nepal we examine how gender quotas are causing seismic cultural shifts. We explore the merits of the Women’s March in the US; the gender politics behind TV taunts; the dynastic nature of female leadership in the Philippines; the economic empowerment of poor women in Fiji; and ask some hard questions about academic life in Australia and why women are side-lined. And that’s just for starters!In the mainstream media this week the talk is all about pay gaps, feminism and TV politics: as old Aunty ABC tosses her nephews aside for IWD! Sunday’s #AllAboutWomen event, with headline act Geena Davis, highlighted just how far we have to go before gender parity on screen, in media … and across numerous sectors (did she really say 730 years!). And just in case we need reminding, the latest gender pay gap report from the WGEA brought more bad news. Happy IWD2017!

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NewsBrief: Week 4 February 2017

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This week all eyes have been on the work place. The Fair Work Commission cut Sunday penalty rates, with the female dominated retail industry copping the biggest blow. Meanwhile bad press due to poor numbers of women has forced the Victorian Liberal party and NSW Trains to holler for more women. In Trump world, the President’s campaign advisor has a new spin on anti-Trump protestors; according to Kellyanne Conway they … “just have a problem with women in power”. And while all the buzz talk was around the Oscar’s oops moment, more sober souls were focused on the ongoing pay disparity between white women actors and those of colour.

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NewsBrief: Week 3 February 2017

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This week has seen the spotlight on one of the oldest issues to beset women – abortion and a woman’s right to self-determination when it comes to sexual and reproductive health. The domestic story focused on Queensland, while Trump’s gag order ignited global debate. Meanwhile back home the hot topic of banning the burqa was rekindled in Victoria, while overseas a Swedish government delegation to Iran coped a media thrashing for covering up with hijabs. While many were celebrating Valentine’s Day with loved ones, girls in Ethiopia flipped the day into a fundraiser.

More NewsBrief here...